Guantanamo Bay Cuba and the ACLU

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Ohg Rea Tone is all or nothing. He is educated and opinionated, more clever than smart, sarcastic and forthright. He writes intuitively - often disregarding rules of composition. Comment on his posts - he will likely respond with characteristic humor or genuine empathy. He is the real-deal.

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Guantanamo Bay Cuba and the ACLU


I received the following email encouraging an email or on-line petition.  I added the italics:

January 11, 2008 will mark six years since the first 20 prisoners arrived at Guantánamo Bay Cuba. Since then, 775 prisoners have passed through the gates and no trials have been completed.

As a symbol of freedom and democracy throughout the world, the United States must hold itself to our own high standards. When we resort to the use of torture, abuse, and indefinite detention we lower ourselves to the level of our enemies and defy the basic values that we hold dear. Guantánamo Bay has tarnished the reputation of the United States and makes a mockery of our core values. Six years on, it is time to call once and for all for the United States to CLOSE GUANTÁNAMO!

Stand with us on January 11th and let’s prove that those who would advocate for a lower standard are on the wrong side of the law… the wrong side of core American values… and the wrong side of history. Join me in signing the petition to Close Guantánamo and stand strong in support of justice

This is a site of the American Civil Liberties Union.  The ACLU automatically provokes emotion – positive for some, negative for others.  I will not join the ACLU effort – because I no longer give credence to the ACLU or the NRA.  As I have noted in previous posts, in the 1970’s I was a proud card carrying member of both organizations – today I would be ashamed to belong to either.

But a comment is deserved on the Guantanamo Bay prison.  There have to be some parameters under which civilized society takes direction.  I am not aware of any boundaries or parameters or law or whatever for the incarceration of people at Guantanamo.  The Geneva Convention addressed the issue of enemy combatants taken prisoner – but I think the Geneva Convention assumed there must be some foreseen, definable moment when the incarceration would end.  In World War II the end date was called simply – The Duration.  But this meant that when the war was over some specific action would be taken – either a trial as a war criminal or set free.

I am deeply disturbed by the actions of my government on behalf of me and my fellow Americans.  My course of action is to write this article, and others like it.  I will participate in an election to diligently find a leader who will respect law and order in a civilized world.


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