It’s a Cat’s Life
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Nancy Belle. I love reading. Words fascinate me. Books have sheltered and given me a safe haven for a great part of my life. Much of what I know about this world is from the written word. I have come to my senior years with desire to write some words, hopefully for your pleasure or enlightenment. Yet, I may have words that some may not like, that's alright, too. Here's to my new adventure!

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It’s a Cat’s Life

I have a barn/porch cat, her name is Skeeter aka Trouble, who would dearly love to be an indoor/outdoor cat. Especially on cold days, 60 degrees appears to be her cue to want in. 

She is in this predicament, because after being in the house for several months, or a year, I forget, she became a hermit and would not leave the spare bedroom, except to hurriedly eat and relieve herself. She also acquired a skin condition where her hair was falling out leaving bald patches all over her body. We thought getting her fixed would help, it didn’t. She was reluctantly put outside. Reluctantly, because, although we live in the country, it is near a State highway, with many critters, like Owls, Hawks, Eagles, Coyotes or stray dogs, who would love a cat for dinner. However, it wasn’t long before she was once again exploring her environment and her beautiful, black panther coat was growing back in.

She became a mighty huntress, bringing us dinner to the front door. Rats, lizards, birds, mice, rabbits and more. In other words she once again was a happy cat, till it gets down around 60 degrees. What was her problem as an indoor cat, you ask? That problem came with a name, Kali Ko. Our resident elderly lady of the house. Kali, also of the cat clan, is about ten years older than Skeeter.

When we brought Skeeter home, it was to be a companion to Kali. As mere humans, there was no way to know, we were just way off base. Skeeter could not come within several feet or eye sight of Kali without being attacked and sent scrambling for safety. We did all we could to promote ‘Friendship’ between the two. It never happened.

Skeeter reacted, as I believe most humans would, she retreated, became nervous and ill. Totally unable to have a happy life. All because of one bully. Even though she was much loved by the rest of us, including the dogs, this did not remedy the cost of bullying on her soul and body. I wish I had recognized sooner, how devastating Kali’s treatment of Skeeter was, so detrimental to her health.

 

Skeeter, as I have said is much happier, she greets us every morning on the porch, enjoying the sunshine and fellowship of those who love her and treat her with respect. She has one Winter under her belt and with the special cat house given to us, managed just fine. Her Winter fur is a delight to run your fingers through and she loves all you will give her. Sometimes to the point of annoyance, hence her other name ‘Trouble’. Her attempts to come back in aren’t as often and may not be because she doesn’t like the weather, but because we don’t spend as much time on the porch when the temps get lower.

This didn’t start out as a statement against bullies and bullying, but I’m glad it evolved as a natural narrative against the practice of picking on others. As a side note; black cats are not evil, they will not cause you bad luck, if they cross your path. Please do not harm any cat or animal based on your fears, prejudices or beliefs. That leads to another analogy, well another time perhaps. The points are made, I think.

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